how to stop overeating

The Mountain Dog Diet – A Different Way To Lose Bodyfat

Another great choice is Macadamia Nut Oil. It’s very stable for cooking (up to around 425 degrees Fahrenheit), and you get a massive dose of healthy monounsaturates. Around 85 percent of the oil is monounsaturated. You get to a point where you don’t want to keep increasing athletes’ levels of protein due to general digestive stress, and you don’t want to raise carbs to astronomical levels just due to the pancreatic stress involved. So the remedy? Add some good ol’ Olive Oil or Macadamia nut oil.

I tried using coconut oil for this purpose, but as I suspected, it burns so fast and easy, it didn’t really help with quality weight gain in the athletes. I’d still use it year round for its antimicrobial and anti-viral properties though, but I steer more toward the monounsaturates in the off-season. It is important to realize that you need to mix things up a bit, and not have the exact same oil all the time.

A couple of other oils you should introduce in your diet are avocado oil and red palm oil. Avocado oil is extremely resistant to oxidation (hold up well up to 500 degrees), and is largely monounsaturated. Also one of recent favorites is red palm oil. The oil is really yellow when you pour it out. That is due to it being loaded with carotenes. This oil is also loaded with Vitamin E, and since it has fat in it, it also helps these fat soluble vitamins absorb as they should.

As far as food sources go, butter actually has a good dose of Palmitoleic acid in it, which is very antimicrobial and a healthy monounsaturate. The fat in butter has more monounsaturated fat then you would think, about 30 percent actually. I include grass fed butter in my diets for this, and other reasons.

There are also many nuts that contain healthy monunsaturated fat such as cashews, macadamia nuts, etc. Over the past few years, I’ve gotten away from adding nuts to diets, not because of any concerns related to health, but because people can’t practice portion control with them. It is impossible for most to sit down and only eat one-fourth cup (1 serving) of cashews. I’m likely to eat an entire pound in a day if I buy a bag.

All in all – you need some of all of these fats to function optimally, whether your body can make them or not, and I recommend 30 to 35 percent of your calories come from fat. Around 25 percent of that should be from saturated, 1.5 – 3 percent from polys/Omega 3 and 6, and the remaining 7 – 8.5 percent from monos during contest season. As you get into more of an off-season mode, the ratio favors monounsaturates a little more heavily, but does not eliminate saturates or polys, as that would not be wise.

 

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